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How to Can Beef or any other meat for long term storage. It is much easier than you think & saves a ton of freezer space plus no freezer burn. Perfect for casseroles, stews, soups, or just plain. #pressurecanning #canning #howtocanbeef #howtocan #longtermstorage #prepper #prepping #paleo #aip #keto #whole30 #glutenfree #thehealthnutmama

How to Can Beef

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Pressure Canning is a way to preserve food for long term storage. I especially like it because it doesn’t get freezer burnt. The food is already cooked so you just open it up & add to stews, casseroles or eat it just like it is. 

A couple of years ago my husband and I bought a whole grass-fed cow from a local farmer & had it processed & frozen. So, a few months later one of our freezers went out so we had to figure out what to do with all the grass-fed beef we had. We couldn’t afford to lose it. And believe me it was a lot of meat!! So what to do? My dad said, “Can it!!” 

Really? He said, “Haven’t you ever seen canned roast beef at the grocery store?” Well, yes, I had. We grew up on it, served over rice or mashed potatoes. So we had a plan.  

So my dad came over & cut up all the meat into cubes for me while I got all my jars ready by sterilizing them in my dishwasher. I think I had the easy job!! He used to be a butcher years ago so he knew exactly how to do it! You can also have your butcher to cut it up for you. That would be a time saver without all the mess.

 

How to Can Beef or any other meat for long term storage. It is much easier than you think & saves a ton of freezer space plus no freezer burn. Perfect for casseroles, stews, soups, or just plain. #pressurecanning #canning #howtocanbeef #howtocan #longtermstorage #prepper #prepping #paleo #aip #keto #whole30 #glutenfree #thehealthnutmama

My husband has been deer hunting & we have a ton of deer meat in the freezer, so guess I’ll be canning some of it too. With grass-fed meat & venison, they tend to be a little tough. So, canning the meat takes care of that problem. It’s so tender & juicy. I like to add seasoning such as garlic powder & onion powder to the venison. This helps to take away the “gamey” taste.

Raw Pack or Hot Pack

There are two methods of canning meat. One is a Raw Pack & the other is a Hot Pack method.

Raw Pack is easier because you just pack the meat into the jar without any liquid. It will make its own broth while canning. I made the mistake of adding water with the first batch & you can imagine the mess it made. Too much liquid has to go somewhere. Well after I cleaned up the mess (it just boiled out of the lids into the canner) I started again. This time with no water in the jars. It worked perfectly. Because it was grass-fed beef, the broth, after it was done canning, didn’t completely cover the meat. That’s not a problem as far as I know & have read. It’s been nearly 3 years & we haven’t had any issues. Raw Packing saves a lot of time & dishes. 

That being said, If you are doing Venison or grass-fed beef you might want to do the Hot Pack Method because the meat might not have enough broth to cover the meat. To Hot Pack the meat you simply pre-cook the meat until rare with a little oil & add the hot meat, drippings, broth & enough filtered hot water to cover the meat leaving 1 in. headspace. Make sure your water is filtered. No chlorine or fluoride. I use the These methods apply to any meat, beef, venison, pork, bison, elk, bear, etc…

For more info on this read this article from the National Center for Home Food Preservation.

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I chose to do the Raw pack method & left some of the fat on the meat.  After my dad got all the meat cut up, I added my seasonings & salt & started raw packing it into the jars. 

My canner that my mom gave me that is probably as old as I am, still works like a charm! This is a newer version of it. This Canner has a metal to metal sealing system so you don’t ever have to worry about gaskets. 

 

Ingredients:

How to Can Beef or any other meat for long term storage. It is much easier than you think & saves a ton of freezer space plus no freezer burn. Perfect for casseroles, stews, soups, or just plain. #pressurecanning #canning #howtocanbeef #howtocan #longtermstorage #prepper #prepping #paleo #aip #keto #whole30 #glutenfree #thehealthnutmama

 

What you will Need:

How to Can Beef or any other meat for long term storage. It is much easier than you think & saves a ton of freezer space plus no freezer burn. Perfect for casseroles, stews, soups, or just plain. #pressurecanning #canning #howtocanbeef #howtocan #longtermstorage #prepper #prepping #paleo #aip #keto #whole30 #glutenfree #thehealthnutmama

 

Directions:

  1. Sterilize Jars. My dishwasher has a sterile cycle, so I just make sure to run them on the sterile cycle ahead of time. 
  2. Fill the canner about 1/4 – 1/3 way full with hot water or to the fill line if your canner has one & turn on low to med. heat.
  3. Put the lids with bands into a pan of boiling water.
  4. Add 1 tsp. of sea salt & any optional seasonings to the jars.
  5. If using the Raw Pack Method, pack jars with meat leaving 1 in of headspace. Pack firmly. Do not add water.
  6. If using Hot Pack Method, pack jars with hot meat, broth, drippings, & enough hot water to fill leaving 1 in. headspace, packing firmly. Remove any air bubbles using the handle of a wooden spoon or butter knife.
  7. Wipe the rims of the jars with a damp paper towel & put the lids on using tongs. They will be hot. Don’t try to tighten too tight, just finger tight as they say.
  8. Use a jar lifter to put the jars into the pressure canner.
  9. Put the pressure canner’s lid on & tighten according to your canner’s instructions.
  10. With my pressure canner, I turn the heat up to med-high until steam starts coming out the vent then I close the vent & let it start building pressure. Make sure to follow your canner’s instruction manual.
  11. Bring pressure up to 10 lbs. Cook 75 min for pints or 90 min for quarts. Make sure to check your canners manual to adjust for your altitude.
  12. Once it is done, turn off the heat & let the pressure come completely down to zero. This is very important. Do not attempt to relieve pressure manually. Once the pressure has completely come down, open vent & lid.
  13. Remove jars using jar lifter & allow to cool for 12-24 hours before moving. You can remove the outer rings as they are not necessary after canning. 

*Scroll down for printable recipe card.

More Canning Recipes:

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How to Can Beef or any other meat for long term storage. It is much easier than you think & saves a ton of freezer space plus no freezer burn. Perfect for casseroles, stews, soups, or just plain. #pressurecanning #canning #howtocanbeef #howtocan #longtermstorage #prepper #prepping #paleo #aip #keto #whole30 #glutenfree #thehealthnutmama

 

How to Can Beef

How to Can Beef or any other meat for long term storage. It is much easier than you think & saves a ton of freezer space plus no freezer burn. Perfect for casseroles, stews, soups, or just plain. #pressurecanning #canning #howtocanbeef #howtocan #longtermstorage #prepper #prepping #paleo #aip #keto #whole30 #glutenfree #thehealthnutmama

Ingredients

  • Beef cut into 1 in. cubes (roughly 1 1/2 lbs per jar)
  • Sea Salt (optional) 1 tsp. per quart or 1/2 tsp. per pint
  • Filtered Water (I love my Berkey filter system) Do not use Tap Water due to fluoride & chlorine. 
  • Onion Powder, Garlic Powder Etc... (optional seasonings)

Instructions

  1. Sterilize Jars. My dishwasher has a sterile cycle, so I just make sure to run them on the sterile cycle ahead of time. 
  2. Fill the canner about 1/4 - 1/3 way full with hot water or to the fill line if your canner has one & turn on low to med. heat.
  3. Put the lids with bands into a pan of boiling water.
  4. Add 1 tsp. of sea salt & any optional seasonings to the jars.
  5. If using the Raw Pack Method, pack jars with meat leaving 1 in of headspace. Pack firmly. Do not add water.
  6. If using Hot Pack Method, pack jars with hot meat, broth, drippings, & enough hot water to fill leaving 1 in. headspace, packing firmly. Remove any air bubbles using the handle of a wooden spoon or butter knife.
  7. Use tongs to put the lids on the jars. They will be very hot. 
  8. Wipe the rims of the jars with a damp paper towel & put the lids on. Don't try to tighten too tight, just finger tight as they say.
  9. Use a jar lifter to put the jars into the pressure canner.
  10. Put the pressure canner's lid on & tighten according to your canner's instructions.
  11. With my pressure canner, I turn the heat up to med-high until steam starts coming out the vent then I close the vent & let it start building pressure. Make sure to follow your canner's instruction manual.
  12. Bring pressure up to 10 lbs. Cook 75 min for pints or 90 min for quarts. Make sure to check your canners manual to adjust for your altitude.
  13. Once it is done, turn off the heat & let the pressure come completely down to zero. This is very important. Do not attempt to relieve pressure manually. Once the pressure has completely come down, open vent & lid.
  14. Remove jars using jar lifter & allow to cool for 12-24 hours before moving. You can remove the outer rings as they are not necessary after canning. 
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4 comments

    • Renee' says:

      Hi Edith, Great question? I have read that to get the best flavor a year, however, I have some that I canned in 2017 & we are still eating it. I think it’s still just as good as it was when I canned it.

  1. Melinda says:

    Renee, Thank you for sharing this info on canning meat on my request!
    I am just learning to use my pressure canner and as we are planning on getting a side of beef I wanted to have a shelf-stable option for preserving it in addition to those that require electricity. While the process feels daunting at first, your article helped clarify my concerns & I feel more confident as a result. Much appreciated!

    • Renee' says:

      Melinda, Thank you for your comment. I have been needing to write this post for a while, & you just motivated me to do so. Thanks!!! I’m glad it clarified some things for you. Let me know if you have any more questions!

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