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How to Can Okra

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Last Updated on September 18, 2020 by Renee’

I am very blessed to have a dad who has an organic garden. This year he outdid himself. We have had so many Green Beans, Squash, Tomatoes, Okra etc…

I have been trying to preserve it all by freezing, canning & fermenting. Right now, the okra is really keeping me busy. 

So I researched several articles & most of them all said pretty much the same thing. I was concerned that they didn’t use a pressure canner or a water bath canner. After researching, I felt pretty confident that this would work. This is the same way my mom & grandmother can tomatoes, without the vinegar, of course.

It was so easy, especially to do just 2 quarts at a time. You can always double or triple the batch if needed. 

From everything I read, after canning, you open the jars, rinse, drain & flour (paleo flour, of course) & fry as normal. I haven’t tried frying it this way, but I wanted to preserve it so that I can add to gumbo’s & soups. 

*Update- My daughter has been making Paleo Southern Fried Okra with our canned Okra from last summer! It is delicious!!! You have to try it!

This recipe makes about 2 quarts. 

Ingredients:

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Tools Needed:

 

Directions:

  • Wash & cut okra into bite-size pieces removing ends.
  • Fill Large Pot with water, add jars & bring to boil. Reduce heat to simmer.
  • Fill Small Pan with water, add rings & lids & bring to boil. Reduce heat to simmer.
  • Add Filtered Water, salt & ACV to Large Pot. Bring to boil.
  • Add Okra. Bring to boil. Cook 6 min. 
  • Remove Jar from boiling water with a jar lifter. Put Canning Funnel on the jar.
  • Use a slotted spoon to put okra in the jar until full leaving 1-inch headspace. May need to shake a couple of times to settle the okra. 
  • Use a stainless measuring cup to pour boiling liquid over the okra until covered with liquid leaving 1-inch headspace.
  • Use a clean towel (paper is fine) dampened to clean rim of jar.
  • Use tongs to remove lid & ring from boiling water & put on jar. Use a towel if necessary to tighten lid. Jar & lid will be hot. 
  • As Jar cools you will hear a pop. That means it has sealed.
  • Repeat for 2nd jar & so on if using pints or doubling the recipe.

Disclaimer:

  • I had a reader very concerned that this wasn’t pressured canned & that it is no longer recommended to can it this way. If you are concerned please pressure can it for 40 min. at 10 lbs. pressure. This recipe was gotten from several “old-timers”.  I haven’t had any issues & we are still eating what we canned last summer. Or if you are unsure, you can freeze your okra. If you do choose to can it this way do at your own risk. 
  • Please refer to the National Center for Home Food Preservation for pressure canning info.

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*Scroll down for printable recipe card.

Some Okra Recipes:

More Canning & Freezing Recipes:

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How to Can Okra for Long Term Storage. Perfect for Frying Southern Style or using in Soups & Gumbo's. #howto #canning #okra #longtermstorage #aip #paleo #whole30 #lowcarb #keto #vegan #southernfried #soup #gumbo #thehealthnutmama www.thehealthnutmama.com

 

More info on canning & preserving here & get your free guide to canning here.

 

Yield: 2 qts

How to Can Okra

How to Can Okra
Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 6 minutes
Additional Time 10 minutes
Total Time 26 minutes

Ingredients

Instructions

  1. Wash & cut okra into bite-size pieces removing ends.
  2. Fill Large Pot with water, add jars & bring to boil. Reduce heat to simmer.
  3. Fill Small Pan with water, add rings & lids & bring to boil. Reduce heat to simmer.
  4. Add Filtered Water, salt & ACV to Large Pot. Bring to boil.
  5. Add Okra. Bring to boil. Cook 6 min.
  6. Remove Jar from boiling water with a jar lifter. Put Canning Funnel on the jar.
  7. Use a slotted spoon to put okra in the jar until full leaving 1-inch headspace. May need to shake a couple of times to settle the okra.
  8. Use a stainless measuring cup to pour boiling liquid over the okra until covered with liquid leaving 1-inch headspace.
  9. Use tongs to remove lid & ring from boiling water & put on jar. Use a towel if necessary to tighten lid. Jar & lid will be hot.
  10. As Jar cools you will hear a pop. That means it has sealed.
  11. Repeat for 2nd jar & so on if using pints or doubling the recipe.

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14 comments

  1. Marjorie says:

    Renee, you are very fortunate that you haven’t gotten sick. However, I agree totally with earlier objections. ALL high acid foods MUST be at least water bath canned. Low acid foods and meats MUST be pressure canned.

    • Renee' says:

      Thank you for your comment. I have added a disclaimer to the recipe. This is an “old-timers” recipe. You do add vinegar for the acid. I’ve never had a problem, but of course, I wouldn’t want anyone to do it this way if they weren’t comfortable.

    • Renee' says:

      Hi Louise, AVC is Apple Cider Vinegar. You need to use an acid in the okra in order to can it. There should be a link in the post on what kind I used. You should be able to get it at any grocery store.

    • Renee' says:

      Hi Robin, This was my thoughts exactly before I canned it the first time. When you open the jars you drain them & rinse. You can’t taste the vinegar at all. One good thing is you can can as few jars as you want then you can try a jar to see if you still want to can them. I was pleasantly surprised. I drain & rinse, then coat with (Paleo) flour & fry like normal. So delicious! Also perfect for gumbo!

      • Jessica nolley says:

        This is the way my grandmother and myself has done okra! Love it! I didn’t get to learn how she did green beans and was wondering if this would work for them also? Hers had a vinegar taste that we loved, but I don’t want to have to pressure can because I do so much at one time.

        • Renee' says:

          Hi Jessica, I just got through doing green beans yesterday, but I fermented them. That may be how she did them. Basically pack them in the jars very tightly then pour a saltwater brine over the beans & let ferment for a few days to a couple of weeks. They are so good!!! I should have a new post written on how to make them in a few days.

  2. Carolyn Myers says:

    My granny canned in a big black iron wash pot. She had to put a quilt in the pot to keep jars from being on the bottom of the pot and keep jars from breaking. It was hard to regulate the temperature of the water over an open fire but it worked.

    For those worried about not pressure canning using the ACV changes the acidic level therefore it works.

  3. Pam says:

    What an incredibly dangerous process. You’re worried about flouride in your water but you don’t care about botulism? You’re endangering yourself and your readers. Get a pressure canner and learn to use it.

    • Renee' says:

      Hi Pam, I researched online & this was the recipe that kept popping up when I was trying to preserve the okra my dad had grown. I noted this in the post. We have been eating ours all winter & it’s been just fine. This recipe is from several “Old Timers”.

      Of course, I care about botulism. I would never want to endanger anyone including myself or my family. I also have a pressure canner & I do know how to use it. If you are concerned you should pressure can it by all means. I haven’t tried it, but I will definitely do so this summer & will update the post accordingly. If pressure canning you would want to pressure can it for 40 min. at 10 lbs pressure for quarts. If you can it, please report back how it turns out. Thanks, Renee’

      • Catherine Boeckmann says:

        You don’t need to pressure can. But you need to water-bath can. There is a difference between boiling water canning and pressure canning; it depends on the acidity of the food. You need to refer to the National Center for Home Food Preservation for today’s safety rules. This recipe does not adhere. Remove OR update it.

        • Renee' says:

          Hi Catherine, This recipe is definitely old fashion. From everything that I have heard it needs it to be acidic in order to can it this way. That’s why you add the vinegar. I have okra that I canned last year that we are still using. We have had no issues. I had already noted in the recipe no longer recommended to can it this way. Thanks for your comment.

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